Hall of Famer Hank Aaron Talks with Bob Costas on MLB Network

HALL OF FAMER HANK AARON Talks with BOB COSTAS ON MLB NETWORK

New episode of Studio 42 with Bob Costas airs Saturday, April 24 at 7:00 p.m. ET/4:00 p.m. PT

April 22, 2010 – Hall of Famer and 21-time All-Star Hank Aaron discusses his legendary 23-year career and his 33-year home run record in a new episode of MLB Network’s Studio 42 with Bob Costas on Saturday, April 24 at 7:00 p.m. ET/4:00 p.m. PT. Taped on April 8, 2010, the 36th anniversary of Aaron breaking Babe Ruth’s home run record, the one-hour interview includes Aaron’s thoughts on breaking the record, African-Americans in baseball, his childhood in Mobile, Ala., his playing career in Milwaukee and Atlanta, former San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds and fellow Hall of Famers Jackie Robinson, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Don Drysdale and Stan Musial.

A preview of the interview can be viewed here.

Following Studio 42 with Bob Costas, MLB Network will air the St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco Giants at 9:00 p.m. ET as part of Saturday Night Baseball. The game will be a carriage of a local telecast, including local announcers, and will be blacked out in each team’s home television territory.

Highlights from the interview with Aaron include:

ON BREAKING RUTH’S RECORD:

It’s no different but it’s a proud moment, not only for me, but it’s a proud moment because you know I think about having the opportunity to do something that nobody said would ever be done. That’s number one.

There will always be … one Babe Ruth. That’s fine. The only thing I was trying to do was tell people that records are made to be broken, no matter who they are or who set the record. No matter what you do, my record that I hit 755 home runs, Barry Bonds came along and broke it. So you have all of this to look at and say, “Hey, that’s the improvement in America. That’s what happens in America.” What we did today is not going to be standing tomorrow because there are going to be other players coming along that’s going to break records.

ON THE PUBLIC RESPONSE TO HIM CHASING THE HOME RUN RECORD:

I got thousands of pieces of mail from white fans [of mine] across the country. And I remember every one of them. And I got millions and millions of pieces of mail from people that were resentful simply because of the fact of who I was and they just were not ready for a black man to break that record.

ON PLAYING IN MILWAUKEE:

I played in Milwaukee for 12 years. In no other city. I played in Milwaukee for 12 years. And if someone had said, “Would you have rather played in Milwaukee or New York?” I would have said Milwaukee. I say Milwaukee now, I say Milwaukee tomorrow, I say Milwaukee two weeks from now. I loved Milwaukee. Milwaukee is my favorite city.

ON WILLIE MAYS & MICKEY MANTLE:

Willie was probably one of the greatest ball players, all-around ball players that I’ve ever seen. … There are not too many players that could do the things that he could do on the field. And I’m the first one to acknowledge that. I’m also the first one to know that I was, personally, I think, I was a better hitter than he was. Now he may think different or somebody else may think different. That’s good.

I realized that I played in Milwaukee. I realized that I played in Atlanta. I realized that the press was not as big in Atlanta and Milwaukee as it is in New York. I’d been knowing that for a long time. But I had no problem of trying to understand that the only thing and the only person that I could control was myself. I couldn’t control what Willie did in New York. I couldn’t control what Mantle or anybody else did. So as far as jealousy, no, there was never any strife, anything in my heart for jealousy for any ball player.

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